Shtick to Business: The Role of Humor in Business and Life with Peter McGraw

Peter McGraw is a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, but he’s also been a stand-up comedian, humorist, adventurer, game show host, and author. All this came about when he developed an itch to solve the age-old question: Why is comedy funny? He found the age-old answers problematic, and so embarked on a journey to discover the true answer that entailed traveling 91,000 miles, trying his hand at stand-up comedy, and hosting his own game show Funny or True. He’s written two books about the experience: The Humor Code, in which he and Joel Warner document the journey, and Shtick to Business, in which he presents the value of his findings in a business context.

Today Peter joins me to talk about his journey and what he’s learned from it. He talks about the common denominator of all comedy, what makes a good comic, and the “benign violation” theory. He discusses the previously accepted theories of comedy and expands on his own. He presents comedy as a universal art form, notes its link to both confidence and intelligence, and talks about the comedic tactic called the “Reversal.” He explains his practice of “shitstorming” as preparation for brainstorming, answers a lightning round of questions about himself, and talks extensively about both of his books. He also discusses the applicability of these comedic principles to other parts of life, particularly noting the usefulness of bad ideas and the Reversal. He ends on the importance of writing.

Quotes from Peter McGraw

“The best comics are kind of misfits.”

“Comedy is just like play fighting with words.”

This week on The School for Good Living:

  • Comedy as an art form
  • Benign violations
  • Comedy, confidence, and intelligence
  • Being funny vs. thinking funny
  • The Reversal
  • The importance of bad ideas.
  • The importance of writing

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

Time Off: Building a Rest Ethic with Max Frenzel

Max Frenzel is the Co-founder of Time Off, a platform to help people and companies deliberately practice time off so they can be their most successful and creative self. He is an AI researcher with Bespoke Inc, an AI Engagement Platform based in Tokyo providing multilingual solutions to hotels, airports and train stations. He earned a PhD in Quantum Information Theory from the Imperial College of London before becoming a Research Scientist with Japanese company Cogent Labs. Max has been involved with several start-ups focusing especially on the intersection of theoretical AI research and product design. As well as co-writing the international #1 Amazon Bestseller Time Off: A Practical Guide to Building Your Rest Ethic and Finding Success Without the Stress, he is also an active writer online and has been featured as Top Writer on medium.com in categories including Artificial Intelligence, Creativity, Writing, Productivity, and Leadership. Max also produces and performs his own electronic music under the name Taketile.

Max joins me today to discuss his book Time Off and explain his philosophy on the importance of rest and downtime in relation to keeping healthy and sustainable productivity levels. Max remembers his days as PhD physics student in London and how the freedom to spend his time outside of his thesis allowed him to expand his ideas and thoughts while travelling, marathon training, and investing in start-ups. He describes what his own rest ethic looks like, including the morning and evening rituals he observes, his meditation practices, and his inspiration from Twitter’s Jack Dorsey on how to allocate focus on work activities. He gives a quick lesson on the history of leisure time and holidaying and explains why an active physical holiday will leave you invigorated and awake, while the passive activity of slouching in front of Netflix for a few hours can leave you drained.

Quotables from Max Frenzel

“I’d say life is all about this search for meaning, whatever that means. I guess the whole point is everyone has to define this meaning for themselves”

“You should really see rest and time off as an investment into your productivity and getting things done and really finding this meaning in your life”

“Essentially creativity to me is about connecting the distant dots”

“We really don’t think that there’s a one-size-fits-all approach to your rest ethic. Like, that should look different for everyone, and normal leisure should look different for everyone. And you have to find out what that means to you”

“If you take good care of your body your mind will be so much clearer and sharp, and also stay sharp for a long time”

“Think about taking time off as an investment into your creativity and into your productivity”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How a relaxed studying schedule gave Max time to formulate new ideas in his leisure time without it feeling like work
  • Why being busier than ever made Max feel he was at his least productive
  • How Max formulated a working friendship with his co-author in a Tokyo to Texas communication
  • Why rest and time off should be viewed as an investment into your productivity
  • Why you should be very conscious of how you use your time and the kinds of rest you invest in
  • Why spending time on social media apps is papering over the cracks of an absence of meaning
  • Why the most productive rest is usually of the very active kind
  • How exercise can achieve a ‘flow state’ where ideas can flourish more readily
  • Max’s 4 phases of the creative process
  • Why ‘visible business’ is not as productive as it looks

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

Hyperfocus: How to Manage Your Attention in a World of Distraction with Chris Bailey

Chris Bailey is the creator of the blog, A Life of Productivity, a platform he launched straight out of graduating from business school. He was on a mission to follow his passion and devour everything he could get his hands on the subject of productivity. By the time he finished his yearlong experiment, his work had been read over one million times by people from almost every country around the world. He’s written two books on productivity which have been published in 20 languages – Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distraction, and The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy. Chris Bailey has been featured in several media publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Harvard Business Review.

In today’s episode Chris joins me to discuss the subject of productivity and the various ways we can savour and squander it. He explains why focusing on one task all day long could be the worst thing you can do for your productivity. He reveals how the activity of knitting, for him, personally releases his thoughts and helps problem solving in a tactic he calls, the ‘scatter focus approach’. He also has some suggestions on what other simple, enjoyable tasks you can do to allow your mind to wander and think. Chris explains how our brains have a ‘novelty bias’, where we can’t help but direct our attention to every new novel thing, and how the answer to that can begin by taking a break from your mobile phone.

Quotables from Chris Bailey

“Life is about extracting meaning out of things that on the surface don’t appear meaningful”

“If you want something done, give it to a busy person”

“The hyper-focus – it’s one of the most valuable ingredients in not only getting things done – but also living a good life”

“If we can process 40% more in every moment because we have a consistent meditation practice? That will make us back hours”

“The more you rely on your mind to do good work, the more you need meditation and mindfulness to be in the arsenal of productivity strategies you deploy”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How you can increase your available time NINE-FOLD by meditating
  • Why the idea of limited attentional space is powerful
  • What productivity means to Chris and his philosophy on life
  • How being intentional will increase your productivity
  • Why a plan helps when you’re unmotivated to complete a task
  • How a scatter focus approach to tasks works
  • Why we tend to over focus on the short run in achieving our goals
  • Why our need for novelty is a dopamine time sap

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Chris Bailey:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

Plastic Ocean: The Sea Captain Who Discovered the Great Pacific Garbage Patch with Captain Charles Moore

Captain Charles Moore is an oceanographer and captain of the research vessel Algalita. He is known for articles that recently brought attention to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – an area of the Pacific Ocean strewn with floating plastic debris caught in a gyre. Charles is the founder of Algalita Marine Research Institute where he currently works, and the founder of Long Beach Organic, a non-profit organization operating eight organic community gardens within the city limits of Long Beach, California. Charles is also the co-author of Plastic Ocean, a book recounting his ominous findings in the ocean and unveiling the secret life and hidden properties of plastics; from milk jugs to polymer molecules small enough to penetrate human skin or be unknowingly inhaled.

Charles joins me today to share the story of his journey from seafaring adventurer to oceanic environmentalist whistle blower. He describes the moment he first discovered the overwhelming sight of the garbage patch in the Pacific Ocean. He also explains how it led him to meet Ricky Grigg, a ‘surfer scientist’ who was the first such scientist to live in an underwater environment. Charles talks about how our relationship with consumerism and need for pristine goods and disposable packaging is one of the main contributors to plastic waste in our oceans. Charles breaks down the hard facts of this pollution, explaining there is no single ‘bad guy’ to blame because the world’s population is collectively at fault, and therefore the solution will have to be “a world historical revolution in the consciousness of the individual to stop polluting plastic.”

Quotables from Captain Charles Moore

“Life is about liberating oneself from those things that constrain it.” – Captain Charles Moore

“What life is increasingly about today is extricating oneself from those forces, which have invaded our mind space and created a kind of moronization of the populace as a whole.”

“For me what life is about is the struggle to become free from the society that is so oppressive at this time in history.”

“The importance of being different is the importance of being able to see a new world, a better world.”

“A citizen of the stone age knew more about what to do with a stone than a citizen of the plastic age knows what to do with plastic.”

“You can’t give a hurricane a higher wage and make it go away.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How encouragement from his parents made Charles understand it was good to be different
  • Why umbrellas are Charles’ waste collectors’ item of choice
  • Why it’s important to have hands on experience conducting experiments
  • Why plastic is not a clean, sterile, harmless material
  • Why we need to be radical in the retooling of production methods for the future
  • How planned obsolescence and the world of advertising encouraged people to define themselves by the products and brands they invest in
  • How hyperproductivity creates hyper waste
  • Why Charles thinks there is no difference between Chinese communists and American capitalists when it comes to production and consumption
  • Why pollution data was pitted against impact evidence
  • Why Charles has appointed himself Ambassador of the world’s garbage patches
  • The terrifying statistic of the oceans’ garbage patch coverage

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

New Age Tycoon: The Life and Legacy of John E. Fetzer with Brian C. Wilson

Brian C. Wilson is a Professor of American Religious History in the Department of Comparative Religion at Western Michigan University. He has a BSc in Medical Microbiology from Stanford University, an MA in Hispanic Studies from Monterey Institute of International Studies, and an MA and a PhD in Religious Studies with the University of California. Brian is also the award-winning author of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and the Religion of Biologic Living. His most recent book is John E. Fetzer and the Quest for the New Age following the spiritual sojourn of a 20th Century Michigan business tycoon.

Brian joins me today to discuss the path he has traveled, powered by a curiosity for the metaphysical questions in life and a desire to serve in a spiritual role. He shares his experience of joining the Peace Corps, where an initial posting to Honduras led him to spend several years traveling Central America and the Caribbean where he was introduced to a host of religious cultures. Brian discusses his links with the Fetzer Institute, located in his neighborhood, and how he eventually came to write John E. Fetzer’s autobiography, a story of an unconventional businessman with New Age beliefs. We also discuss reincarnation, spiritual camps for mediums and psychics, and the history of the Ouija board with the positive and negative associations to it.

Quotables from Brian C. Wilson

“World religions are so rich and there’s such interesting history and theology and philosophy people have developed, that if you take a deep dive it really does help you to better understand not only the world around you and the way people have perceived it, but also your own ideas of the world.”

“World religions are so rich and there’s such interesting history and theology and philosophy people have developed, that if you take a deep dive it really does help you to better understand not only the world around you and the way people have perceived it, but also your own ideas of the world.”

“World religions are so rich and there’s such interesting history and theology and philosophy people have developed, that if you take a deep dive it really does help you to better understand not only the world around you and the way people have perceived it, but also your own ideas of the world.”

“World religions are so rich and there’s such interesting history and theology and philosophy people have developed, that if you take a deep dive it really does help you to better understand not only the world around you and the way people have perceived it, but also your own ideas of the world.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • Why differing religions should be compared for understanding rather than rank
  • How Brian’s time in the Peace Corps opened up new ways of looking at his own religion
  • Why John E. Fetzer was not your typical American business tycoon
  • Why the Ouija board gets a bad rap
  • What Brian discovered about his own beliefs researching his latest book
  • How Fetzer gave up his business interests to create a legacy in the Fetzer Institute before his death
  • Why you should keep a journal when you travel
  • Brian’s tips on finding a story worth writing about and his own creative process

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

My Creative Space: Design Your Home for Ideas and Innovation with Donald Rattner

Donald Rattner is an Architect who helps individuals and organizations optimize creative performance by applying scientific research to the design of physical space. A widely published author, his third and most recent book My Creative Space: How to Design Your Home to Stimulate Ideas and Spark Innovation, has won three awards to date and was an Amazon #1 Bestseller. He has also written for numerous print and online channels including Work Design Magazine, Better Humans, and The Writer’s Cooperative. Donald’s work has been featured on CNN and in such publications as The New York Times, Houzz, and Architectural Digest. Donald also has an impressive teaching resume, having taught at the University of Illinois, New York University School of Real Estate Studies, Parsons School of Design, and the New York Academy of Art.

Donald joins me today to discuss the origins of My Creative Space and who he felt the book was written for: the architects, design professionals, interior designers, and the people who are simply passionate about shaping their home or workspaces. He explains why he likes to link his creative philosophies to science backed theories in an effort to be as truthful and supported in his instruction as possible. We discuss how the act of creating can be considered a risky endeavor, creating our need for a safe space to produce creative output. We also discuss how the natural environment influences our mood and behaviors, how colors can affect where we direct our concentration, and how the shape of the ceiling you work under can have an enormous effect on your mood and sense of well-being.

Quotables by Donald Rattner

“The word creativity has a long history and that the meanings do change over the millennia.”

“Creativity is the development of novel and useful ideas for products services and systems.”

“Creativity, health and happiness tend to fall on the same spectrum with respect to the surrounding environment, meaning that whatever cues or triggers or inputs in your environment improve creativity, tend to boost the other two as well.”

“Social norms to a great degree do kind of discourage us from being creative. So, it takes a certain amount of courage. Courage requires the sense of safe space -that I have the space to do this creative act.”

“It’s all about what we perceive, not necessarily what literally IS.”

This week on The School for Good Living:

  • Why Donald prefers to link his creative processes to science backed theory
  • How our environments influence health, happiness, and creativity
  • Why open spaces are conducive to open thinking
  • Why there is a discouragement of creativity in the general working world
  • The 3 main groups of Donald’s tactics that can contribute to unlocking a creative block
  • The book Donald has recommended more than any other
  • Donald’s writing process and the pivots of direction that led to the completion of My Creative Space
  • Why you should take breaks when undertaking a creative problem

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire with Rebecca Henderson

Rebecca Henderson, FBA, is an economist and author of Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire. She is a professor at Harvard Business School, where she teaches Reimagine Capitalism, the most successful MBA elective course at HBS in the last five years. In addition to her authorship and work at Harvard, Rebecca also serves as Research Fellow at the National Bureau for Economic Research and as a sustainability advisor to the world’s largest companies. Rebecca is a leading authority in organizational and strategic change whose work focuses on purpose-driven capitalism and the role that businesses and individuals can play in making change happen.

Rebecca joins me today to share her ideas on Reimagining Capitalism and contemplate how we can contribute as individuals to social, political, and economic change. She illustrates how the idea of shareholder value maximization is destructive to the environment and society and reveals the two foremost causes of the world’s enduring predicaments. She also describes how working with others can act as an antidote to despair and highlights the need to reimagine democracy as a means to reimagine – and change – capitalism.

“We will only be able to reimagine capitalism if we bring our personal purpose to work.” – Rebecca Henderson

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • The roots of the world’s problems and why Rebecca wrote Reimagining Capitalism
  • The destructive nature of maximizing shareholder value
  • Our illusion of separateness and what makes it difficult for us to think about others and the future
  • Finding our paths to changing the world and how we give up our power by believing we don’t have any
  • Working with others to drive change as an antidote to despair
  • Self-care as a radical act of political resistance and the importance of finding joy
  • How writing and publishing Reimagining Capitalism has changed Rebecca’s life
  • Why we need to reimagine our democracy
  • Rebecca’s writing routine and how it has evolved over the years
  • The challenge of cultivating discipline in writing and the role of caffeine in Rebecca’s work as a writer
  • How Rebecca identified stories to include in Reimagining Capitalism
  • The most challenging part of writing and Rebecca’s advice for writers

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review.

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.

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In Service to Love: Discovering Our Divinity with Darlene Green

Darlene Green is the author of In Service to Love: A Dynamic Experience of Consciousness, Transformation, and Enlightenment, a series of three books written in 366 days. Darlene is an empath, healer, teacher, and scribe who dedicates her life to pursuing work and studies that delve deeper into experiencing the sacred and divine. Following a car accident in 2017, Darlene began a profound healing process that eventually led her to write In Service to Love, a work that contemplates what becomes possible when we live from our soul’s vision.

Darlene joins me today to share her healing journey towards wholeness and what she has learned from overcoming trauma caused by the car accident she experienced. She illustrates humanity as divine beings and defines what it means to be a spiritual being living a human experience. She describes her spiritual life as a young girl and how she met the Council of Light. She also discusses how we can align with our divinity for creative inspiration and connect with our highest creative potential.

“Your divinity is closer to you than religion. Being in service to love and connecting with divinity are the “I am” of us.” – Darlene Green

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Seeing the whole of humanity as love and divine beings
  • How In Service to Love came to Darlene and “requested” to be written
  • The healing modalities Darlene studied and practiced
  • The difference between living life as a human being with a spiritual experience and living life as a heavenly being with a human experience
  • Life as a process of understanding and Darlene’s struggle with being broken
  • Choosing who you are and how you act in the face of difficult circumstances
  • Darlene’s relationship with writing before she wrote In Service to Love
  • Experiencing spirituality as a young girl and how Darlene discovered her spiritual Council of Light
  • Our inner critic, the cacophony of voices inside of us, and listening to the “I Am”
  • The clarity we feel when we’re young and how we lose it as we age
  • The power of conscious choice and holding an intention for your wholeness
  • The declarative nature of perspectives and how they create reality
  • Where creativity comes from and what gets in the way of our greatest creative potential
  • The hand and the glove and looking at our divinity for creative inspiration
  • How we can connect more fully with creativity
  • Meditation as a tool to move our awareness towards unknown realms and invite a different level of creativity
  • The remarkable power of intention and aligning with our divine knowing
  • Becoming aware of your creative process that honors who you are and doing your best work
  • Learning ourselves as part of the creative process

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review.

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.

Wabi Sabi: The Beauty of a Simple Life with Beth Kempton

Beth Kempton is the author of four books, including Wabi Sabi: Japanese Wisdom for a Perfectly Imperfect Life, an international bestseller that has been recommended by TIME Magazine and translated into 24 languages. A dedicated student of Japanese culture, language, and life, Beth earned an undergraduate and a master’s degree in Japanese studies and has extensively traveled and lived in the country. In addition to her writing, Beth is the founder of Do What You Love, through which she inspires people to live well and do what they love.

Beth joins me today to share perspectives and ideas from Japan. She describes wabi-sabi as a mode of how we experience beauty in the world and how shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, can deliver the healing potential of nature. She highlights strategies to become a more mindful gift-giver and how to get through the holiday season to have a fantastic new year. She also shares her insights on writing and illustrates the writer’s role as a conduit for manifesting ideas into a book.

“Wabi-sabi is an intuitive response to a particular kind of beauty that reminds us of the impermanence of everything.” – Beth Kempton

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Experiencing the dance of nature as active, conscious creators and passive witnesses
  • Beth’s background in Japanology and experience with shinrin-yoku
  • Forest bathing as a meditative practice and its potential to heal
  • Japanese aesthetics and how it has been impacted by industrialization
  • What wabi-sabi means, how it’s been misused in the West, and why Beth wrote a book on the subject
  • The dangers of social media’s conversation on image, achievement, and perfection
  • Why wabi-sabi is less about what we see and more about how we see
  • The collective yearning for beauty and a simple life
  • The heart-mind and how different decisions are made in different parts of the body
  • The tendency of writers to only write about a single topic forever and the underlying theme in Beth’s books
  • Helping people explore the values of stillness through her book, We Are In This Together
  • The relationship between mental health and the holiday season
  • The Five Stories of Christmas and how finding your Christmas Constellation can change your experience of the holiday season
  • The historical roots of holiday traditions
  • Writing what you want to know and letting your books become your mentors
  • Being unsure of whether the world needs your book and how writing a book is about clarity and confidence
  • How writing a book proposal can help you push past the inner critic
  • Podcasting as an effective platform to build authority
  • Why writers need to think of marketing their books as a service to their prospective readers

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review.

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.

The Middlescence Manifesto: Rethinking Middle Age with Barbara Waxman

Barbara Waxman is a Life Stage Expert, coach, and author of The Middlescence Manifesto: Igniting the Passion of Midlife. As a Gerontologist-coach, Barbara founded the Odyssey Group Coaching, where she offers her unique coaching model, Entrepreneurship Turned Inward, to help people in their midlife develop professionally and personally. Barbara is a next-level thinker on a mission to advocate for a thriving midlife and to shift cultural norms around aging.

Barbara joins me today to share her ideas about “middlescence” and shares powerful tools we can utilize to age well. She discusses finding your life purpose, differentiates between the little ‘p’ purpose from big ‘P’ Purpose, and illustrates how the former can lead to the latter. She shares her “Five to Thrive” quiz and enumerates the five essential elements everybody needs to live an exuberant and vibrant life. She also rethinks the narrative that midlife is a crisis and emphasizes how we all can find happiness and fulfillment throughout the years until the end of our life.

“Middlescent people have the energy and wisdom from lived experiences to become great leaders. Our world needs us now more than ever.” – Barbara Waxman

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • The power of language and semantics
  • Stanley Hall, the creation of adolescence, and how our ideas about the different stages of life evolved through time
  • What ‘middlescence’is and its similarities and differences with adolescence
  • The identity shifts involved in both adolescence and middlescence
  • David Brooks’ “Resume” and “Eulogy” virtues
  • Writing a letter from your hundred-year-old self and why Barbara enjoys reading obituaries
  • Barbara’s thoughts on the prevalence of mental health issues in the country
  • Contemplating on joy and passion and the difference between the “big P” and “little p” purpose
  • Preparing for the One Great Act and why people seem depleted when they’re looking for their life’s purpose
  • Self-care as a revolutionary act and how it becomes even more important as we age
  • Barbara’s “Five to Thrive” quiz and the five essential elements and practical tools in living and aging well
  • The myth of the midlife crisis
  • The U-curve of happiness and how happiness dips and comes back
  • Why Barbara wrote the Middlescence Manifesto
  • Why the world needs people in their middlescence now more than ever
  • Barbara’s pre-COVID leadership work in India
  • Why Barbara doesn’t consider herself as a writer
  • My love-hate relationship with writing and how Barbara got the Middlescence Manifesto completed
  • The writers’ challenge of cultivating a social media following
  • The power of celebrating your life’s greatest failures

Related Content:

Resources Mentioned:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review.

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.