135. Eve Joseph – In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Dying

One of the questions I always ask guests is, “What does it mean to live a good life?”  For the first time, however, a guest has left me thinking about changing that question to, “What does it mean to die a good death?”  This guest is Eve Joseph, an award-winning poet, incredible storyteller, and the author of a book about death and dying (which also happens to be her memoir) entitled In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Death and Dying.  The book flows out of Eve’s lessons and insights from working with and serving people at the end of their lives as a hospice care provider and represents the two central themes of the conversation: death and writing. 

Eve’s life has been marked by distinct seasons.  She fell in love with writing in fifth grade, but for about thirty years stopped writing.  In that intervening period, Eve got married, had children and became a social worker within the hospice care system of her native Canada.  Profound family events shaped her cessation from writing and later resumption of the practice, and the writing of her later years is shaped by the cumulative impact of her decades of remarkable experience.  She has experienced indigenous culture, faced illness and tragedy, and spent herself in service to others.

Eve is an insightful and creative person committed to drawing as much as she can out of both life and death. I thoroughly enjoyed speaking with her.  In this conversation, Eve and I talk about our society’s relation to and (limited) understanding of death, what it means to have a good death, lessons in metaphor, the creative process and the role of solitude in it, what Eve learned from having a stroke, and what is common in different cultures’ understandings of death.      

“Poetry knows more than I do.” – Eve Joseph

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Why Eve doesn’t have an answer to the question of what life is about
  • What sets her memoir apart from her previous books
  • When Eve started writing, why she stopped, and what she did while not writing
  • The intersection between the drive to be creative and the drive to be helpful
  • The family events that have shaped Eve and her writing
  • How all factors of life come to bear in writing and in being with a dying person
  • Can you be a poet and not write?  What does it mean to be a poet?
  • Eve’s sense of self and authenticity is related to poetry
  • How society denies and is frightened by death
  • What the significance is of death kits and not dying at home
  • Why a too-firm concept of a good death is problematic, and how Eve wants to die
  • What Eve has seen different cultures share in their approaches to death
  • Why Eve named her book as she did
  • What Eve has to say about outsourcing, community, rituals, and even gardening
  • Living poetically and why young writers should follow what they love
  • Eve’s thoughts on metaphor and how her stroke shaped her
  • A wild ride, living generously, avoiding slogans, the value of books, and care for others
  • Give money away and it comes back
  • Why Eve values solitude as a writer, but doesn’t call herself a writer
  • Eve’s perspective on technology and audience as a writer
  • Why Eve suggests writers start with a passion, send their work out, and try different forms

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Eve Joseph:

  • To connect with Eve Joseph and learn more about her and her work visit her website

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

134. Matthew Gavin Frank – Passion, Travel, Diamond Smuggling & The Writing Life

All people have passion and curiosity, but Matthew Gavin Frank is notable for pushing these to the point of obsession – a creative, productive, compelling obsession.  He is the author of Preparing the Ghost and Flight of the Diamond Smugglers, among other works, and is a creative writing professor in the MFA program at Northern Michigan University.  Matthew’s work has appeared widely in journals and magazines around the world.  His writing has a personal tone to it, and it reflects Matthew’s own navigation of such influences on his life as travel, food, and even personal grief.  

Matthew Gavin Frank’s life has been filled with remarkable experiences.  He has lived in Alaska, worked as a sommelier and grape harvester in Italy, spent time on the orange farm in South Africa where his wife is from, lived out of a Coleman Cimmaron in New Mexico, and held dozens of different jobs.  He’s an accomplished cook and a travel addict, has learned through the past two decades how to live well in close relationship with another person, and is committed to fixating on and losing himself in all aspects of life – the simple, the complex, and the mystifying. 

I have been fascinated reading Matthew’s work and learning about his life and am excited for him to share about everything from the story behind his latest book, to his interest in birds, to the way he thinks about the world and living well in it.  This episode, in its breadth and manner of weaving through thoughts and ideas, also represents an exploration of my own creativity. I hope it will inspire and motivate those who hear to put their own creativity to work. 

“Life is about making a mess.” – Matthew Gavin Frank

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • What it might look like to put your creativity to work
  • Why Matthew thinks life is about making a mess and like an unlocked envelope
  • The reasons for Matthew’s high esteem of a very cold climate
  • Matthew’s advice to not skip breakfast and practice of writing on barf bags
  • When traveling, say yes to everything and pack rain gear
  • How bewilderment can help a marriage, and the need for engaging the affirmative
  • A sugar packet can change a life, and cold water can force a cry
  • Why Matthew doesn’t think making a career of a passion is necessarily a good idea
  • Why travel, exposure to diverse voices, and art are important
  • Why using money for experience is to be preferred overusing for material things
  • How Matthew’s writing process is like walking through a meadow
  • Questing after something is more compelling than the presumption of certainty
  • How grief spurred Matthew’s interest in carrier pigeons and diamond smuggling
  • Why Matthew isn’t sure what to call himself
  • Unexpected facts and words from his recent project, and how grief is beautifully small
  • Why Matthew is impressed by nuanced levels of human ingenuity bordering on desperation
  • How Matthew would advise people on writing a book or completing a creative project

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Matthew Gavin Frank:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

133. Stephan Aarstol – The Five Hour Workday: Live Differently

Stephan Aarstol is the author of the book Five-Hour Workday: Live Differently, Unlock Productivity, and Find Happiness, which gives advice on how to live life to the fullest by cultivating more efficiency in fewer work hours. Stephan’s ideas have been shared in Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Forbes, and he’s also presented at Harvard Business School. Stephan holds an MBA in New Venture Management, was a guest on the television series ‘Shark Tank’, won an investment from Mark Cuban, and is now founder and CEO of Tower Paddleboards and Tower Beach Club.

In this podcast, Stephan shares the origins of the 8-hour workday and his experience shifting his own employees to practicing the 5-hour workday. He dives into how the experiment came to be, the percentage increase in productivity, the people who influenced Stephan’s career, and the importance of company culture. Listen as Stephan brings you along on his journey of how he shifted his views on life and work.   

“Time is the new money.” –Stephan Aarstol

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • The purpose of life and how to live to the fullest
  • The adventures that life can hold
  • How to look past the chaos and hardships of life
  • People who influenced Stephan’s life, career, and book
  • His experience on Shark Tank- the beginning idea, his pitch, and his career now
  • How to use your business to help people rather than to only make money
  • How Stephan helped grow his company
  • How the 5-hour workday increases productivity and creativity
  • The history of the 8-hour workday
  • Benefits of the 5-hour workday for employers and employees
  • How to rethink and innovate businesses to increase efficiency
  • How the 5-hour workday experiment unfolded
  • The impact of company culture
  • The biggest influencers and lessons learned on this 5-hour workday experiment
  • Stephan shares some of the daily routines his company practices
  • Stephan shares some book and travel recommendations
  • Stephan talks about developing habits, making relationships, and the truth about money
  • His routine in writing and the importance of good marketing
  • The process of Stephen’s book becoming a reality
  • Stephan shares advice and encouragement on finishing creative projects

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephan:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

132. Marcus Whitney – Create and Orchestrate: The Path to Claiming Your Creative Power

Marcus Whitney is the author of Amazon bestseller Create and Orchestrate: The Path to Claiming Your Creative Power from an Unlikely Entrepreneur.  Early in his professional career, Marcus was a college dropout waiting tables seven days a week, but he taught himself to code, became an entrepreneur, and eventually became a venture capitalist.  He is co-founder and partner at Jumpstart Health Investors and he more recently launched Jumpstart Nova.  His work has been covered by The Atlantic, Fast Company and TechCrunch. Marcus is also a co-founder and minority owner of the Nashville Soccer Club, Nashville’s MLS team, and the producer and host of The Creative Power Podcast

I connected with Marcus through Nexus and I’m so glad I did! He joins me today to share openly about the challenges he has faced, overcome and to explain his inspiring life journey. Marcus talks about his experience becoming and being an entrepreneur and author; offers thoughts on how he thinks about the world, himself and the concept of story; and comments on the power that entrepreneurship, words and healthy self-care all hold.     

“If there is anything I’ve learned through the process of writing a book, it is that words matter, and semantics matter… [T]he world operates on precision.” – Marcus Whitney

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • How showing up for others and doing meaningful work are essential to life
  • Why it may be better to hold purpose statements loosely
  • How Marcus defines himself and what he’s passionate about
  • Why it is valuable to come to terms with challenges overcome and every version of yourself
  • How Marcus’ insight arises from personal experience and stories
  • Why prisons are dehumanizing and mentoring inmates brought concrete results
  • The power of reflecting on our lives and sharing our stories to inspire others
  • It’s Marcus’ job to spread the word about the power of entrepreneurship to others
  • How Marcus applies the four burners theory
  • How his eight core concepts, the concept of frameworks and inheritability, operate
  • Entrepreneurship is a sport and life involves a time budget
  • Words and semantics matter and the world operates on precision
  • What life is like, what t-shirt Marcus wears, and why he gave up alcohol
  • Insight regarding change, race, money and making relationships work
  • Marcus began his book five years ago as a Kickstarter project
  • How calling, Claire, a TEDx talk and leaving town helped with writing and editing
  • What resources may be helpful for a writer and ideas for marketing a new book
  • Marcus’ final advice for listeners to understand themselves and their lives

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephen:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

130. Stephen Cope – Dharma and Deep Human Connection

Stephen Cope’s training, career, and beliefs have gone through a vast array of changes: he was a psychotherapist, pianist, and professional dancer. He was at different times a Protestant, a Presbyterian, a Quaker, and a Buddhist. When he took what he had planned to be a three-month sabbatical from his psychotherapy practice to immerse himself in yoga, he discovered that he wanted to stay. Less than a year later, he closed his psychotherapy practice to teach Yoga at Kripalu. For decades now, he has immersed himself in yoga and in teaching it to others through classes, conferences, and books as well. His most recent book is Deep Human Connection: Why We Need It More Than Anything Else.

Today Stephen joins me to talk about his journey. He discusses the concept of Dharma, going into both how to recognize it and how to know when you have it. He talks about the importance of becoming fully awake and alive in this lifetime and notes that it often takes a leap of faith. He talks about the three “hunting grounds” that help you to find your Dharma. He expands on his notion of letting go of the outcome and letting your skills lead you. He ends by delving into the topic of relationships in the context of his latest book.

“Everybody has a true calling.”

“When you investigate anything that’s fascinating you or calling you, you discover that there’s something about you in there that you need to know.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • The search for meaning and community
  • Finding and recognizing Dharma
  • The three hunting grounds for finding Dharma
  • Stephen’s definition of duty
  • Letting go of the outcome and following your skills
  • Relationships

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephen:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

129. Steven Kotler – The Art of Impossible: A Peak Performance Primer

Steven Kotler is a New York Times bestselling author and an award-winning journalist. He is the Executive Director of the Flow Research Collective, as well as the co-host of a podcast by the same name. He is one of the world’s leading experts on human performance and has appeared in over 100 publications. In addition, he has been nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes. In his latest book, The Art of Impossible: A Peak Performance Primer, which he calls “a practical playbook for impractical people,” he reveals the secret to his productivity: to lean into the challenge before you realize you’ve even done it.

Today, Steven joins me to expand on this principle. He discusses how stopping to think about the prospect of completing a task is the greatest obstacle to doing it. He talks about how beginning is the hardest part. He discusses curiosity, passion, and purpose, noting that with these most tasks don’t take more than twenty seconds of grit: the grit it takes to start. He mentions the three most important aspects of feedback on his writing, what defines a peak performer, and the importance of knowing where you’re going instead of just where you’re starting.

“Whenever the impossible becomes possible, there’s always a formula.”

“Flow follows focus.”

“If it goes on the clear goals list, that’s a promise to get it done.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • Keeping your mission to yourself
  • Doing it instead of talking about it
  • The importance of integrity
  • How five-minute breaks break your flow
  • Knowing where you’re going
  • Avoiding arrogance

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Steven:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

128. Peter McGraw – Shtick to Business: The Role of Humor in Business and Life

Peter McGraw is a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, but he’s also been a stand-up comedian, humorist, adventurer, game show host, and author. All this came about when he developed an itch to solve the age-old question: Why is comedy funny? He found the age-old answers problematic, and so embarked on a journey to discover the true answer that entailed traveling 91,000 miles, trying his hand at stand-up comedy, and hosting his own game show Funny or True. He’s written two books about the experience: The Humor Code, in which he and Joel Warner document the journey, and Shtick to Business, in which he presents the value of his findings in a business context.

Today Peter joins me to talk about his journey and what he’s learned from it. He talks about the common denominator of all comedy, what makes a good comic, and the “benign violation” theory. He discusses the previously accepted theories of comedy and expands on his own. He presents comedy as a universal art form, notes its link to both confidence and intelligence, and talks about the comedic tactic called the “Reversal.” He explains his practice of “shitstorming” as preparation for brainstorming, answers a lightning round of questions about himself, and talks extensively about both of his books. He also discusses the applicability of these comedic principles to other parts of life, particularly noting the usefulness of bad ideas and the Reversal. He ends on the importance of writing.

Quotes from Peter McGraw

“The best comics are kind of misfits.”

“Comedy is just like play fighting with words.”

This week on The School for Good Living:

  • Comedy as an art form
  • Benign violations
  • Comedy, confidence, and intelligence
  • Being funny vs. thinking funny
  • The Reversal
  • The importance of bad ideas.
  • The importance of writing

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Peter:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

127. Max Frenzel – Time Off: Building a Rest Ethic

Max Frenzel is the Co-founder of Time Off, a platform to help people and companies deliberately practice time off so they can be their most successful and creative self. He is an AI researcher with Bespoke Inc, an AI Engagement Platform based in Tokyo providing multilingual solutions to hotels, airports and train stations. He earned a PhD in Quantum Information Theory from the Imperial College of London before becoming a Research Scientist with Japanese company Cogent Labs. Max has been involved with several start-ups focusing especially on the intersection of theoretical AI research and product design. As well as co-writing the international #1 Amazon Bestseller Time Off: A Practical Guide to Building Your Rest Ethic and Finding Success Without the Stress, he is also an active writer online and has been featured as Top Writer on medium.com in categories including Artificial Intelligence, Creativity, Writing, Productivity, and Leadership. Max also produces and performs his own electronic music under the name Taketile.

Max joins me today to discuss his book Time Off and explain his philosophy on the importance of rest and downtime in relation to keeping healthy and sustainable productivity levels. Max remembers his days as PhD physics student in London and how the freedom to spend his time outside of his thesis allowed him to expand his ideas and thoughts while travelling, marathon training, and investing in start-ups. He describes what his own rest ethic looks like, including the morning and evening rituals he observes, his meditation practices, and his inspiration from Twitter’s Jack Dorsey on how to allocate focus on work activities. He gives a quick lesson on the history of leisure time and holidaying and explains why an active physical holiday will leave you invigorated and awake, while the passive activity of slouching in front of Netflix for a few hours can leave you drained.

Quotables from Max Frenzel

“I’d say life is all about this search for meaning, whatever that means. I guess the whole point is everyone has to define this meaning for themselves”

“You should really see rest and time off as an investment into your productivity and getting things done and really finding this meaning in your life”

“Essentially creativity to me is about connecting the distant dots”

“We really don’t think that there’s a one-size-fits-all approach to your rest ethic. Like, that should look different for everyone, and normal leisure should look different for everyone. And you have to find out what that means to you”

“If you take good care of your body your mind will be so much clearer and sharp, and also stay sharp for a long time”

“Think about taking time off as an investment into your creativity and into your productivity”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How a relaxed studying schedule gave Max time to formulate new ideas in his leisure time without it feeling like work
  • Why being busier than ever made Max feel he was at his least productive
  • How Max formulated a working friendship with his co-author in a Tokyo to Texas communication
  • Why rest and time off should be viewed as an investment into your productivity
  • Why you should be very conscious of how you use your time and the kinds of rest you invest in
  • Why spending time on social media apps is papering over the cracks of an absence of meaning
  • Why the most productive rest is usually of the very active kind
  • How exercise can achieve a ‘flow state’ where ideas can flourish more readily
  • Max’s 4 phases of the creative process
  • Why ‘visible business’ is not as productive as it looks

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Max Frenzel:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

126. Chris Bailey – Hyperfocus: How to Manage Your Attention in a World of Distraction

Chris Bailey is the creator of the blog, A Life of Productivity, a platform he launched straight out of graduating from business school. He was on a mission to follow his passion and devour everything he could get his hands on the subject of productivity. By the time he finished his yearlong experiment, his work had been read over one million times by people from almost every country around the world. He’s written two books on productivity which have been published in 20 languages – Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distraction, and The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy. Chris Bailey has been featured in several media publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Harvard Business Review.

In today’s episode Chris joins me to discuss the subject of productivity and the various ways we can savour and squander it. He explains why focusing on one task all day long could be the worst thing you can do for your productivity. He reveals how the activity of knitting, for him, personally releases his thoughts and helps problem solving in a tactic he calls, the ‘scatter focus approach’. He also has some suggestions on what other simple, enjoyable tasks you can do to allow your mind to wander and think. Chris explains how our brains have a ‘novelty bias’, where we can’t help but direct our attention to every new novel thing, and how the answer to that can begin by taking a break from your mobile phone.

Quotables from Chris Bailey

“Life is about extracting meaning out of things that on the surface don’t appear meaningful”

“If you want something done, give it to a busy person”

“The hyper-focus – it’s one of the most valuable ingredients in not only getting things done – but also living a good life”

“If we can process 40% more in every moment because we have a consistent meditation practice? That will make us back hours”

“The more you rely on your mind to do good work, the more you need meditation and mindfulness to be in the arsenal of productivity strategies you deploy”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How you can increase your available time NINE-FOLD by meditating
  • Why the idea of limited attentional space is powerful
  • What productivity means to Chris and his philosophy on life
  • How being intentional will increase your productivity
  • Why a plan helps when you’re unmotivated to complete a task
  • How a scatter focus approach to tasks works
  • Why we tend to over focus on the short run in achieving our goals
  • Why our need for novelty is a dopamine time sap

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Chris Bailey:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

125. Captain Charles Moore – Plastic Ocean: The Sea Captain Who Discovered the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Captain Charles Moore is an oceanographer and captain of the research vessel Algalita. He is known for articles that recently brought attention to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – an area of the Pacific Ocean strewn with floating plastic debris caught in a gyre. Charles is the founder of Algalita Marine Research Institute where he currently works, and the founder of Long Beach Organic, a non-profit organization operating eight organic community gardens within the city limits of Long Beach, California. Charles is also the co-author of Plastic Ocean, a book recounting his ominous findings in the ocean and unveiling the secret life and hidden properties of plastics; from milk jugs to polymer molecules small enough to penetrate human skin or be unknowingly inhaled.

Charles joins me today to share the story of his journey from seafaring adventurer to oceanic environmentalist whistle blower. He describes the moment he first discovered the overwhelming sight of the garbage patch in the Pacific Ocean. He also explains how it led him to meet Ricky Grigg, a ‘surfer scientist’ who was the first such scientist to live in an underwater environment. Charles talks about how our relationship with consumerism and need for pristine goods and disposable packaging is one of the main contributors to plastic waste in our oceans. Charles breaks down the hard facts of this pollution, explaining there is no single ‘bad guy’ to blame because the world’s population is collectively at fault, and therefore the solution will have to be “a world historical revolution in the consciousness of the individual to stop polluting plastic.”

Quotables from Captain Charles Moore

“Life is about liberating oneself from those things that constrain it.” – Captain Charles Moore

“What life is increasingly about today is extricating oneself from those forces, which have invaded our mind space and created a kind of moronization of the populace as a whole.”

“For me what life is about is the struggle to become free from the society that is so oppressive at this time in history.”

“The importance of being different is the importance of being able to see a new world, a better world.”

“A citizen of the stone age knew more about what to do with a stone than a citizen of the plastic age knows what to do with plastic.”

“You can’t give a hurricane a higher wage and make it go away.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • How encouragement from his parents made Charles understand it was good to be different
  • Why umbrellas are Charles’ waste collectors’ item of choice
  • Why it’s important to have hands on experience conducting experiments
  • Why plastic is not a clean, sterile, harmless material
  • Why we need to be radical in the retooling of production methods for the future
  • How planned obsolescence and the world of advertising encouraged people to define themselves by the products and brands they invest in
  • How hyperproductivity creates hyper waste
  • Why Charles thinks there is no difference between Chinese communists and American capitalists when it comes to production and consumption
  • Why pollution data was pitted against impact evidence
  • Why Charles has appointed himself Ambassador of the world’s garbage patches
  • The terrifying statistic of the oceans’ garbage patch coverage

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Captain Charles Moore:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.