140. Roman Krznaric – The Good Ancestor: Long Term vs. Short Term Worlds

Roman Krznaric is the author of the book The Good Ancestor: A Radical Prescription for Long-Term Thinking, which shares six practical ways we can retrain our brains to be future-focused. He guides us on how we might shift our priorities to saving our planet and the quality of humanity beyond ourselves now. Roman is also the founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum, a founding faculty member at School of Life in London, and an empathy advisor to organizations including Oxfam and the United Nations. Both his book and life experiences offer advice on how to live in a way that impacts future generations for the better.

In this podcast, Roman shares his own life story and journey to discover the true importance of what it means to be a good ancestor and to think of future generations rather than only yourself. Listen as he shares his own personal experience and advice on how to live this out, how to set goals with the future in mind, and how to be a good ancestor.  

“We discover ourselves through looking outside ourselves; through outrospection as much as introspection.” –Roman Krznaric

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • The purpose of life and how to live to the fullest
  • How Roman’s role as a gardener has taught him new things
  • The most important question of our time
  • Thoughts on being a good ancestor and what it means to look to the future
  • The importance of asking yourself what legacy you are leaving  
  • The inspiration behind Roman’s book and what he wants people to get out of it
  • What it means and looks like to colonize the future
  • Different ways to think long-term
  • How one person can make a difference
  • Chalk festivals and cultivating important rituals
  • How to incorporate younger generations into politics and citizen assemblies
  • The role of empathy in looking to the future
  • The importance of being interested in others and not just yourself
  • Roman’s favorite books and biggest influences
  • Some of Roman’s best travel hacks
  • How to build relationships
  • How to connect with Roman
  • Roman’s journey into writing and his current writing routine
  • Challenging and rewarding aspects of writing
  • Advice and encouragement for other writers
  • Roman talks about his TED Talk
  • Roman Gives some of his best writing tips

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Roman Krznaric:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

139. Héctor García – Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Healthy Life

I lived in Japan for a period and love the country, culture, and language. It is what drew me to read Héctor García’s book, Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life, co-authored with Francesc Miralles. In my conversation with Héctor, we discuss how the book takes some Japanese concepts and combines them with other Eastern thought, Western philosophy, and practical philosophy.  Perhaps this melding of ideas is why the book has sold so well. Its influence has been far-reaching and remarkable – translated into at least 58 world languages and is the most translated book to have originally been written in Spanish.

As Héctor explains, the term “ikigai” roughly indicates one’s purpose in life (technically translating as “a reason for being”). To use Héctor’s own vivid explanation, it is what wakes you up with excitement in the morning. Héctor’s insightful exploration of this profound theme shapes not just the book bearing its name, but also Héctor’s other works. He is the author of The Book of Ichigo Ichie, Forest Bathing, and A Geek in Japan (which shares a title with his long-running blog).  His most recent book, The Ikigai Journey, offers action steps to accompany the philosophical ideas in Ikigai, and his soon-to-be-released Ikigai for Teens offers to help younger readers navigate questions of purpose. 

Héctor is a thoughtful person whose life experience spans countries and cultures – from his Spanish hometown to his many years in Japan – as well as fields of study and engagement.  He was training in computer science when he realized his affinity for writing, and even now he combines working in IT with his ventures as a writer and self-styled aspiring philosopher.  I find his ideas to be inclusive and compelling.  Any listener can learn from Héctor about living deeply and well, and aspiring writers are sure to be intrigued by his unique writing process.

“I’m aspiring to become a better thinker, . . . to have clear thoughts about what all this is about.” – Héctor García

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • How the purpose of life can be conceived of in terms of a two-fold search – plus having fun!
  • How Héctor believes people can learn about themselves
  • Héctor’s tendency to become obsessed with things and the new interest he wants to pursue
  • Héctor’s photography and why he considers himself an aspiring philosopher
  • Thoughts on why Ikigai resonates with so many Indian readers
  • How Héctor and his co-author arrived at the model on the back of their book
  • What ikigai is, what holds people back from living it and whether or not it changes over time
  • Why compasses are to be preferred over maps and what makes for a bad ikigai declaration
  • Thoughts on action steps, laying aside expectations and universal realities
  • What life is like and the fact that people can achieve greatness in most areas with effort
  • Hêctor’s “Do It” shirt and accompanying advice to would-be writers
  • Who to read and why travel is better with a physical book
  • Héctor’s story of how writing brought healing and of finding himself by removing things
  • His reflections on the US culture’s sense of being the center of the world
  • What four pieces of insight Héctor has found to help his relationships work
  • How to think about emotions tied to money
  • When Héctor first realized he was a writer and how he persisted in the face of rejection
  • The way in which Héctor thinks about and has used personal connections
  • The place of proto-ideas, ongoing books, green tea and more in his writing process
  • How co-writing has worked and the persona being developed now
  • Remembering that great authors were once children can be helpful to new writers

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Héctor García:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

138. Bernard Roth – The Achievement Habit: Take Command of Your Life

My guest today joined the Stanford Design Division faculty in 1962. He was the youngest member of the university faculty and now decades later, he’s the oldest faculty member.  His name is Bernard (Bernie) Roth and he is the author of The Achievement Habit: Stop Wishing, Start Doing, and Take Command of Your Life. As one of the founders of Stanford’s d.school, he remains active in the d.school’s development and currently serves as the Academic Director.  Bernie’s primary intention as both an educator and a person, is to empower his students, family and friends to have fulfilling lives. He’s the kind of teacher we all want, and some are fortunate to have in their academic careers. 

In 2003, Bernie joined a group of colleagues looking to bring more cross-disciplinary collaboration into education. This was the genesis of the d.school, and it represents the sense of well-roundedness and personal integration that Bernie exudes.  He is a person whose philosophy and commitments mark all he does, from the classroom to the home and whose consistency in denying fallacious crutches in our beliefs, is rivaled only by his consistency in trying to live and be as best he can.  Bernie’s work is perhaps epitomized in the way he encourages his students and others to take concrete action to either produce a result that matters to them – something they have always wanted to do but haven’t done – or resolve a problem in their life. 

Bernie’s insight is fascinating and counterintuitive.  His ways of conceptualizing the world and the ways people and events engage in it made me think. I have no doubt they will make you think as well.  I found myself challenged by Bernie’s differentiation between trying and doing, along with his charge to trade contemplation for action.  I was grateful to be able to speak with Bernie and I hope that the conversation, and Bernie’s work, are useful and inspiring to you.

“The best thing in life is to just say what you do or what you don’t do without worrying about why.” – Bernie Roth

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Bernie’s belief that life is about itself and that the rest is all made up
  • What Bernie means when he says he’s dedicated to living
  • How two improbable and unplanned events led Bernie to work at Stanford
  • Why Bernie thinks our behavior is automatic and our so-called reasons are excuses
  • The complexity of our motivation and the driving force of self-image
  • How we should focus on what we do and don’t do, not on the question of why
  • How we can change our attitude and self-image and Bernie’s story about timeliness
  • We can change things and life is basically a problem-solving activity
  • How we impart meaning to our lives by where we start and stop a story
  • What Bernie’s class called “The Designer in Society”
  • How a course project has led to concrete change and stories Bernie is proud of
  • How this course and the d.school have changed over time
  • Why Bernie believes people need to differentiate between trying and doing
  • Life is like a crap shoot and most big things happen accidentally
  • Bernie’s thoughts on presence, living day by day and being able to say, “I am here”
  • Thoughts on traveling light, spending sabbaticals abroad and shedding a critical outlook
  • How Bernie thinks Americans can best think about American “specialism”
  • Don’t over-rate or under-rate money and know some of our money-mindset is inherited
  • How Bernie’s two books differ and what his most recent book writing process looked like
  • How writing the book and connecting with his agent involved accidental happenings
  • Why Bernie says writing a book is a living process and his advice to aspiring writers

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Bernard Roth:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

137. Jeff Speck – Walkable City: Building Better Places

This week my guest is Jeff Speck, a city planner and urban designer who advocates internationally for more walkable cities. His book, Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time was written not just for designers, but to also convert generalists to his cause. Walkability doesn’t just impact city planning; it has huge effects on economics, health, and the environment. Jeff’s TEDtalks on the subject has been viewed over 4 million times.

We built our cities to accommodate pedestrians for centuries and they worked well. Now we’re building our cities structured around the idea of everyone driving cars and they are significantly less efficient. Separating the work, home, and hobby aspects of our lives through city planning has created less livable, less equitable environments. Jeff shares the ways our government and laws have made walkability more difficult and how he and other city planners have been working to change those laws and add value to communities. This is a slow process, but Jeff says every city across the US could benefit from a walkability report.

We remind listeners that there are sacrifices to be made by living in a more walkable environment, but the benefits can significantly outweigh them.

“You should have as good a time you can while you’re alive, while giving as good a time to as many others as you can.” – Jeff Speck

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Life is about having as good a time as you can
  • Jeff’s skill in collecting and communicating ideas
  • Why sprawl is the worth thing we’ve ever invented
  • The economic argument for walkability
  • The health argument for walkability
  • The environmental argument for walkability
  • How millennials living priorities have changed now that they’re having children
  • Why is America like this?
  • Focus as a commodity and writing in Italy
  • Who is the reader Jeff has in mind when writing
  • Getting your ideas out into the world – public speaking vs. writing books

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Dr. Antonio Zadra:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

136. Antonio Zadra – When Brains Dream: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep

Dr. Antonio Zadra is the author of When Brains Dream: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep alongside co-author Robert Strickgold, they detail a new theory on why we dream and call it the NEXTUP model. Antonio is a researcher who focuses on the scientific study of dreams, including everyday dreams, nightmares, lucid dreams, sleep terrors, and sleep walking. Together with his students and collaborators, Antonio has published over one hundred research articles and collected thousands of firsthand dream reports. 

Antonio is committed to balance – balance between a sense of presence and an ability to plan for the future and balance between soaking all he can out of life’s moments without becoming too caught up in things either good or bad.  As a college student, a dream turned him to psychology, which led him to fulfill his ultimate aim of studying dreams and becoming, as he styles it, an oneironaut.  Through his many roles as a professor, author and speaker, Antonio has approached dreams with both scientific rigor and childlike curiosity. He grounds himself in objective study while losing himself in explorations of the mysterious worlds our sleeping selves create.

If you’re interested in understanding yourself, the world, life on a deeper level, if you’re intrigued by dreams – what they are, where they come from, how we use them, why they even happen, then you’ll like today’s guest.    

“Dreams are really any kind of subjective experience we have while asleep.” – Dr. Antonio Zadra

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • What is an oneironaut?
  • How Dr. Zadra became a student of dreams
  • How frustration with misconceptions about dreams eventually produced a book
  • How the idea for When Brains Dream expanded and came to include a new theory
  • What this new theory behind dreaming entails
  • Dreaming is not equivalent to REM sleep
  • How Dr. Zadra defines a dream and thinks about different valuations of dreams
  • Why “Dreaming is Like Taking LSD” and what the Grateful Dead have to do with telepathy
  • How to (not) explain the dreams of Mendeleev and a woman who won the lottery
  • The science of the brain at play in some seemingly miraculous dreams
  • How dreaming, neural integration, monitoring, and evolution interrelate
  • How the scientific and academic communities are responding to this new theory
  • Why Dr. Zadra is fascinated by dream characters
  • Whether anyone can learn how to navigate lucid dreams with proficiency
  • How dreams shape Dr. Zadra’s worldview
  • Thoughts on headlamps, smoking, igloos, listening, patience, and not wasting money
  • Why Dr. Zadra has mixed feelings on whether or not to call himself a writer
  • Why he considers fiction writing very enjoyable but harder than scientific writing
  • The value of enjoying the journey rather than fixating on the endpoint
  • How marketing and promotion are difficult and in many ways out of our hands
  • The value of coherence and enjoyment in a work of fiction
  • Final thoughts on sleep, paying attention to dreams and the appreciation of books

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Dr. Antonio Zadra:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

135. Eve Joseph – In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Dying

One of the questions I always ask guests is, “What does it mean to live a good life?”  For the first time, however, a guest has left me thinking about changing that question to, “What does it mean to die a good death?”  This guest is Eve Joseph, an award-winning poet, incredible storyteller, and the author of a book about death and dying (which also happens to be her memoir) entitled In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Death and Dying.  The book flows out of Eve’s lessons and insights from working with and serving people at the end of their lives as a hospice care provider and represents the two central themes of the conversation: death and writing. 

Eve’s life has been marked by distinct seasons.  She fell in love with writing in fifth grade, but for about thirty years stopped writing.  In that intervening period, Eve got married, had children and became a social worker within the hospice care system of her native Canada.  Profound family events shaped her cessation from writing and later resumption of the practice, and the writing of her later years is shaped by the cumulative impact of her decades of remarkable experience.  She has experienced indigenous culture, faced illness and tragedy, and spent herself in service to others.

Eve is an insightful and creative person committed to drawing as much as she can out of both life and death. I thoroughly enjoyed speaking with her.  In this conversation, Eve and I talk about our society’s relation to and (limited) understanding of death, what it means to have a good death, lessons in metaphor, the creative process and the role of solitude in it, what Eve learned from having a stroke, and what is common in different cultures’ understandings of death.      

“Poetry knows more than I do.” – Eve Joseph

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • Why Eve doesn’t have an answer to the question of what life is about
  • What sets her memoir apart from her previous books
  • When Eve started writing, why she stopped, and what she did while not writing
  • The intersection between the drive to be creative and the drive to be helpful
  • The family events that have shaped Eve and her writing
  • How all factors of life come to bear in writing and in being with a dying person
  • Can you be a poet and not write?  What does it mean to be a poet?
  • Eve’s sense of self and authenticity is related to poetry
  • How society denies and is frightened by death
  • What the significance is of death kits and not dying at home
  • Why a too-firm concept of a good death is problematic, and how Eve wants to die
  • What Eve has seen different cultures share in their approaches to death
  • Why Eve named her book as she did
  • What Eve has to say about outsourcing, community, rituals, and even gardening
  • Living poetically and why young writers should follow what they love
  • Eve’s thoughts on metaphor and how her stroke shaped her
  • A wild ride, living generously, avoiding slogans, the value of books, and care for others
  • Give money away and it comes back
  • Why Eve values solitude as a writer, but doesn’t call herself a writer
  • Eve’s perspective on technology and audience as a writer
  • Why Eve suggests writers start with a passion, send their work out, and try different forms

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Eve Joseph:

  • To connect with Eve Joseph and learn more about her and her work visit her website

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

134. Matthew Gavin Frank – Passion, Travel, Diamond Smuggling & The Writing Life

All people have passion and curiosity, but Matthew Gavin Frank is notable for pushing these to the point of obsession – a creative, productive, compelling obsession.  He is the author of Preparing the Ghost and Flight of the Diamond Smugglers, among other works, and is a creative writing professor in the MFA program at Northern Michigan University.  Matthew’s work has appeared widely in journals and magazines around the world.  His writing has a personal tone to it, and it reflects Matthew’s own navigation of such influences on his life as travel, food, and even personal grief.  

Matthew Gavin Frank’s life has been filled with remarkable experiences.  He has lived in Alaska, worked as a sommelier and grape harvester in Italy, spent time on the orange farm in South Africa where his wife is from, lived out of a Coleman Cimmaron in New Mexico, and held dozens of different jobs.  He’s an accomplished cook and a travel addict, has learned through the past two decades how to live well in close relationship with another person, and is committed to fixating on and losing himself in all aspects of life – the simple, the complex, and the mystifying. 

I have been fascinated reading Matthew’s work and learning about his life and am excited for him to share about everything from the story behind his latest book, to his interest in birds, to the way he thinks about the world and living well in it.  This episode, in its breadth and manner of weaving through thoughts and ideas, also represents an exploration of my own creativity. I hope it will inspire and motivate those who hear to put their own creativity to work. 

“Life is about making a mess.” – Matthew Gavin Frank

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • What it might look like to put your creativity to work
  • Why Matthew thinks life is about making a mess and like an unlocked envelope
  • The reasons for Matthew’s high esteem of a very cold climate
  • Matthew’s advice to not skip breakfast and practice of writing on barf bags
  • When traveling, say yes to everything and pack rain gear
  • How bewilderment can help a marriage, and the need for engaging the affirmative
  • A sugar packet can change a life, and cold water can force a cry
  • Why Matthew doesn’t think making a career of a passion is necessarily a good idea
  • Why travel, exposure to diverse voices, and art are important
  • Why using money for experience is to be preferred overusing for material things
  • How Matthew’s writing process is like walking through a meadow
  • Questing after something is more compelling than the presumption of certainty
  • How grief spurred Matthew’s interest in carrier pigeons and diamond smuggling
  • Why Matthew isn’t sure what to call himself
  • Unexpected facts and words from his recent project, and how grief is beautifully small
  • Why Matthew is impressed by nuanced levels of human ingenuity bordering on desperation
  • How Matthew would advise people on writing a book or completing a creative project

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Matthew Gavin Frank:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

133. Stephan Aarstol – The Five Hour Workday: Live Differently

Stephan Aarstol is the author of the book Five-Hour Workday: Live Differently, Unlock Productivity, and Find Happiness, which gives advice on how to live life to the fullest by cultivating more efficiency in fewer work hours. Stephan’s ideas have been shared in Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Forbes, and he’s also presented at Harvard Business School. Stephan holds an MBA in New Venture Management, was a guest on the television series ‘Shark Tank’, won an investment from Mark Cuban, and is now founder and CEO of Tower Paddleboards and Tower Beach Club.

In this podcast, Stephan shares the origins of the 8-hour workday and his experience shifting his own employees to practicing the 5-hour workday. He dives into how the experiment came to be, the percentage increase in productivity, the people who influenced Stephan’s career, and the importance of company culture. Listen as Stephan brings you along on his journey of how he shifted his views on life and work.   

“Time is the new money.” –Stephan Aarstol

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • The purpose of life and how to live to the fullest
  • The adventures that life can hold
  • How to look past the chaos and hardships of life
  • People who influenced Stephan’s life, career, and book
  • His experience on Shark Tank- the beginning idea, his pitch, and his career now
  • How to use your business to help people rather than to only make money
  • How Stephan helped grow his company
  • How the 5-hour workday increases productivity and creativity
  • The history of the 8-hour workday
  • Benefits of the 5-hour workday for employers and employees
  • How to rethink and innovate businesses to increase efficiency
  • How the 5-hour workday experiment unfolded
  • The impact of company culture
  • The biggest influencers and lessons learned on this 5-hour workday experiment
  • Stephan shares some of the daily routines his company practices
  • Stephan shares some book and travel recommendations
  • Stephan talks about developing habits, making relationships, and the truth about money
  • His routine in writing and the importance of good marketing
  • The process of Stephen’s book becoming a reality
  • Stephan shares advice and encouragement on finishing creative projects

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephan:

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Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

132. Marcus Whitney – Create and Orchestrate: The Path to Claiming Your Creative Power

Marcus Whitney is the author of Amazon bestseller Create and Orchestrate: The Path to Claiming Your Creative Power from an Unlikely Entrepreneur.  Early in his professional career, Marcus was a college dropout waiting tables seven days a week, but he taught himself to code, became an entrepreneur, and eventually became a venture capitalist.  He is co-founder and partner at Jumpstart Health Investors and he more recently launched Jumpstart Nova.  His work has been covered by The Atlantic, Fast Company and TechCrunch. Marcus is also a co-founder and minority owner of the Nashville Soccer Club, Nashville’s MLS team, and the producer and host of The Creative Power Podcast

I connected with Marcus through Nexus and I’m so glad I did! He joins me today to share openly about the challenges he has faced, overcome and to explain his inspiring life journey. Marcus talks about his experience becoming and being an entrepreneur and author; offers thoughts on how he thinks about the world, himself and the concept of story; and comments on the power that entrepreneurship, words and healthy self-care all hold.     

“If there is anything I’ve learned through the process of writing a book, it is that words matter, and semantics matter… [T]he world operates on precision.” – Marcus Whitney

This week on The School for Good Living Podcast:

  • How showing up for others and doing meaningful work are essential to life
  • Why it may be better to hold purpose statements loosely
  • How Marcus defines himself and what he’s passionate about
  • Why it is valuable to come to terms with challenges overcome and every version of yourself
  • How Marcus’ insight arises from personal experience and stories
  • Why prisons are dehumanizing and mentoring inmates brought concrete results
  • The power of reflecting on our lives and sharing our stories to inspire others
  • It’s Marcus’ job to spread the word about the power of entrepreneurship to others
  • How Marcus applies the four burners theory
  • How his eight core concepts, the concept of frameworks and inheritability, operate
  • Entrepreneurship is a sport and life involves a time budget
  • Words and semantics matter and the world operates on precision
  • What life is like, what t-shirt Marcus wears, and why he gave up alcohol
  • Insight regarding change, race, money and making relationships work
  • Marcus began his book five years ago as a Kickstarter project
  • How calling, Claire, a TEDx talk and leaving town helped with writing and editing
  • What resources may be helpful for a writer and ideas for marketing a new book
  • Marcus’ final advice for listeners to understand themselves and their lives

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephen:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential. 

130. Stephen Cope – Dharma and Deep Human Connection

Stephen Cope’s training, career, and beliefs have gone through a vast array of changes: he was a psychotherapist, pianist, and professional dancer. He was at different times a Protestant, a Presbyterian, a Quaker, and a Buddhist. When he took what he had planned to be a three-month sabbatical from his psychotherapy practice to immerse himself in yoga, he discovered that he wanted to stay. Less than a year later, he closed his psychotherapy practice to teach Yoga at Kripalu. For decades now, he has immersed himself in yoga and in teaching it to others through classes, conferences, and books as well. His most recent book is Deep Human Connection: Why We Need It More Than Anything Else.

Today Stephen joins me to talk about his journey. He discusses the concept of Dharma, going into both how to recognize it and how to know when you have it. He talks about the importance of becoming fully awake and alive in this lifetime and notes that it often takes a leap of faith. He talks about the three “hunting grounds” that help you to find your Dharma. He expands on his notion of letting go of the outcome and letting your skills lead you. He ends by delving into the topic of relationships in the context of his latest book.

“Everybody has a true calling.”

“When you investigate anything that’s fascinating you or calling you, you discover that there’s something about you in there that you need to know.”

This week on The School For Good Living:

  • The search for meaning and community
  • Finding and recognizing Dharma
  • The three hunting grounds for finding Dharma
  • Stephen’s definition of duty
  • Letting go of the outcome and following your skills
  • Relationships

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Stephen:

Subscribe, Rate & Share! 

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of the School for Good Living Podcast, with your host, Brilliant Miller. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. 

Don’t forget to visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn. And be sure to share your favorite episodes with your friends and colleagues on social media to inspire others to improve their lives and reach their full potential.